Mood and Form

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Xter
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Mood and Form

Postby Xter » Wed Jul 13, 2016 5:22 pm

EDIT: I just threw all my original into an NSFW, and added the below lines:

To calculate the effect of mood/form and proficiency, use the following formula:

[100-{(100-m)/4}]*[100-{(100-p)/4}]

p=proficiency
m=mood


Thanks to Sok, Cygnus, and Prof X for contributing greatly to the creation and expansion of this formula.

[+] NSFW
Due to a recent discussion in the PT on this, I figured that when looking for game help, this is the spot, not Fight to the Big 3, and that this was useful, so it should go here.

Sokolov wrote:
If a player has 0 mood but 100 proficiency, they will be playing at about 75% of their skills.

Same thing in reverse: 0 proficiency, 100 mood, 75% of skill level.



And when both are at 0:
Cygnus wrote:
It'd be 0.75 * 0.75 = 0.5625, so around 56%.


SO:

doing the (see below) maths I have come up with a table on how the general affect will be.

25/75 will be: 75%
50/50 will be: 75%
75/75 will be: 87%
25/25 will be: 66%
75/50 will be: 82%

[nsfw]Here are the maths:

Every 4 numbers the mood drops, the percent will drop 1 percent.

Then I found the percent at 75 mood: 100-(25/4)
Then I found the percent at 25 mood: 100-(75/4)
etc...

then I multiplied them, like Cygnus did.

I dub this process: Xter's Formula on Mood and Form.

I hope it's correct.
Last edited by Xter on Mon Jul 18, 2016 5:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Mood and Form

Postby Professor PolarX » Thu Jul 14, 2016 12:37 am

I've checked somewhat, and I believe it is correct. Somewhat long maths is below. (m = mood and p=proficiency/form)

So, the mood can range from 0-100, which means that the mood can drop from 100 to 0, which is a 100 point drop. However, the skill level can only drop down to 75, which is a 25 point drop, and therefore 100/25=4 and every 4 point mood drop = 1 skill level drop. Same thing with the proficiency.

Now let's look at how Xter calculated the skill level and check. Be careful about choosing which numbers to divide by 4: The number that is divided by 4 should be 100-m or 100-p, not m or p. So the actual formula would be:
[100-{(100-m)/4}]*[100-{(100-p)/4}] (a bit complicated, but should be able to understand. Xter did write this down in the NSFW, but did not explain it. I'm using different brackets so it is not as confusing.)

Let's choose one of Xter's examples - 50 mood/50 proficiency.

[100-{(100-50)/4}]=87.5
[100-{(100-50)/4}]=87.5
0.875*0.875= 0.765625 which is not what Xter's example equals, but it seems like that someone forgot that 25*75 does not equal to 50*50. This is one of the ways to check whether two different mood and proficiency levels equal to the same skill level.(Incorrect info has been posted here. Now deleted.)

Let's calculate the skill level with one of my examples - 66/35.

[100-{(100-66)/4}]=91.5
[100-{(100-35)/4}]=83.75
0.915*0.8375=0.7663125
So a player with 66 mood and 35 proficiency would play at 76.63125% of his/her original stats

Now let's move onto a decimal proficiency. Same formula, but a bit more complicated with a bit more decimal places- 96/19.7

[100-{(100-96)/4}]=99
[100-{(100-19.7)/4}]=79.925
0.99*0.79925=0.7912575
So a player with 96 mood and 19.7 proficiency would play at 79.12575% of his/her original stats.

Well, that took some time. Made me nearly skip brekky! I hope my checking was correct, so I did not waste time on this.

Oh yeah! I dub this - [100-{(100-m)/4}]*[100-{(100-p)/4}] - Xter's Corrected And More Complicated Formula on Mood and Form.
Last edited by Professor PolarX on Thu Jul 14, 2016 6:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Mood and Form

Postby Sokolov » Thu Jul 14, 2016 2:42 am

Excellent work guys!! Awesome thread.
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Re: Mood and Form

Postby Xter » Thu Jul 14, 2016 4:27 am

To avoid major scroll time, I threw this into an NSFW. I assure you all, this is perfectly safe for work, no fear. Unless your work doesn't like math.

[+] NSFW
I chose to liberally round to what I like to call "happy" numbers.

Basically, the Prof stated what I stated, with a much superior explanation.

I say we still dub it the XFMP.


What Prof stated that was new: m*p=M*P , which is very handy indeed. We'll call it the "Professors Equation"

Assuming the PE is TRUE, we could correlate a "happy combo" such as 100 and 0, to an "unhappy combo" such as 17 and 59.2.

Now how would we do that?


So the following is true:

IF m*p=M*P then the effect on player performance is the same.

IF m*p<M*P then the effect on player performance is that the larger side will have less of an effect.

IF m*p>M*P then the effect on player performance is that the larger side will have less of an effect.

To avoid the "heavy maths" you could use the above method, one calculation, and see where it ends up.




To apply this to the game now:

Say you have two players avg 88 and 90. The 88 (Player A) is at 100 and 80. The 90 player (Player B) is at 89 and 91.

8,000 vs 8,099. We can conclude that the 90 overall suffers less of an effect, so we would choose to start the 90 overall. (of course, this could delve into the branch of "Key Statisticals". Let's not)

To correlate the almost exact effect, I have made a handy table:



0,000=== .750
1,000=== .775
2,000=== .800
3,000=== .825
4,000=== .850
5,000=== .875
6,000=== .900
7,000=== .925
8,000=== .950
9,000=== .975
10,000==No negative effects.



So to narrow it down even more:

the difference between 1,000 and 2,000 is 1,000 numerically, and in terms of effect decrease/increase is .025.

So every numerical value is worth .00025 relative effect points. E.G. .025%.

Therefore, to find your EXACT percent decrease, here is the formula:

x=numerical value (e.g. 1,234) This is the m*p

(x*.000025)+.750=Exact number.

If we use 1,234 we end up with:

(1,234*.000025)+.750=.78085 OR player stats go from 100% effective to 78.085% effective.

I dub this: Xter's Relative Effect of Mood and Proficiency.

Professor, feel free to check my work. I want to be correct.
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Re: Mood and Form

Postby Professor PolarX » Thu Jul 14, 2016 6:48 am

Xter wrote:To avoid major scroll time, I threw this into an NSFW. I assure you all, this is perfectly safe for work, no fear. Unless your work doesn't like math.

[+] NSFW
I chose to liberally round to what I like to call "happy" numbers.

Basically, the Prof stated what I stated, with a much superior explanation.

I say we still dub it the XFMP.


What Prof stated that was new: m*p=M*P , which is very handy indeed. We'll call it the "Professors Equation"

Assuming the PE is TRUE, we could correlate a "happy combo" such as 100 and 0, to an "unhappy combo" such as 17 and 59.2.

Now how would we do that?


So the following is true:

IF m*p=M*P then the effect on player performance is the same.

IF m*p<M*P then the effect on player performance is that the larger side will have less of an effect.

IF m*p>M*P then the effect on player performance is that the larger side will have less of an effect.

To avoid the "heavy maths" you could use the above method, one calculation, and see where it ends up.




To apply this to the game now:

Say you have two players avg 88 and 90. The 88 (Player A) is at 100 and 80. The 90 player (Player B) is at 89 and 91.

8,000 vs 8,099. We can conclude that the 90 overall suffers less of an effect, so we would choose to start the 90 overall. (of course, this could delve into the branch of "Key Statisticals". Let's not)

To correlate the almost exact effect, I have made a handy table:



0,000=== .750
1,000=== .775
2,000=== .800
3,000=== .825
4,000=== .850
5,000=== .875
6,000=== .900
7,000=== .925
8,000=== .950
9,000=== .975
10,000==No negative effects.



So to narrow it down even more:

the difference between 1,000 and 2,000 is 1,000 numerically, and in terms of effect decrease/increase is .025.

So every numerical value is worth .00025 relative effect points. E.G. .025%.

Therefore, to find your EXACT percent decrease, here is the formula:

x=numerical value (e.g. 1,234) This is the m*p

(x*.000025)+.750=Exact number.

If we use 1,234 we end up with:

(1,234*.000025)+.750=.78085 OR player stats go from 100% effective to 78.085% effective.

I dub this: Xter's Relative Effect of Mood and Proficiency.

Professor, feel free to check my work. I want to be correct.

All in NSFW:
[+] NSFW
Now I've done some checking to discover what is correct and what is wrong. First thing is that my m*p was wrong. Whoops. I'll find out the actual 'easy' formula for all of this later when I have more time and if I can. It also turned out that the table was incorrect because when the two mood and proficiency are both 0, the actual effect is 56.25% instead of 75%. So, here's the new table:

0,000 === 56.25
1.000 === 60.625
2,000 === 65
3,000 === 69.375
4,000 === 73.75
5,000 === 78.125
6,000 === 82.5
7,000 === 86.875
8,000 === 91.25
9,000 === 95.625
10,000 === 100
(done in actual percentage form)

So the difference between 1,000 and 2,000 is actually 4.375 instead of 2.5. Which means that every numerical value is actually 0.004375% and so the formula is:

x=m*p/100
(x*0.4375)+56.25=Player Performance(%)
Note that this is only an estimate about how your player would perform. It is not completely accurate, but should be close enough. For more detail, go to my previous post for the longer and more complicated, but accurate formula.

Maybe Xter can use 56.25 and 4.375 to do something?


EDIT: New NSFW because I simply cannot think of a way to simplify the formula [100-{(100-m)/4}]*[100-{(100-p)/4}]. So I'm going to add a guide to calculate with the formula, how it would work and what you should do with an example.
[+] NSFW
So the formula is pretty easy to use (in my opinion). Like, all you need is a calculator, the formula and your player's mood and proficiency levels in front of you. Now using it to calculate which player is actually better might seem difficult, but in reality, it should be a piece of cake!

The first thing you want to do is to determine the position and the key stats. So if the players are two Chasers you want to compare, you should choose the key stats as ACC, SPD, AGI and DEX, or whatever you think is the most important for your player and position. If you want to find out more about Key Stats, the link is http://quidditch-manager.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=1471. So for an example, say I have two Chasers I want to compare. The first Chaser has 50 ACC, 50 SPD, 50 AGI and 50 DEX. The second Chaser has 52 ACC, 52 SPD, 52 AGI and 52 DEX.

Now that the key stats are chosen, you really only want to compare those stats, as they play the biggest part in the position. However, you can also compare other stats if you have a lot of time (like I do, writing this). Now you can choose how you want to compare. Maybe rank the stats, or add a value to the stats, and multiply the value and the stat. Now for my example, I will use a rank system, and I think that ACC is most important, then DEX, AGI and SPD.

So after that, you should calculate the actual performance level using the formula. Take the formula and pop in the values. For my example, the 50's Chaser has 90 mood and 90 proficiency, but my 55's Chaser has only 80 mood and proficiency. The first Chaser will play at 95.0625% and the second Chaser will only play at 90.25%.

Now finally, apply the performance level to the stats. 50*95.0625%=47.53125. 52*90.25%=46.93. The rank wasn't used in this example, as all the key stats were the same for each player. But in a real situation, you would have to apply the performance level to all stats and stat comparing from the first ranked stat. Then you can figure out (with some logic) which player would be better for you. In this case, the first Chaser was better, but if you can also just let your other Chaser play all 4 matches and gain proficiency quicker, resulting in a better Chaser. There are also other factors such as age, but since they have nothing to do with mood and proficiency, I won't bring them up in this post. But just for example, if the first Chaser was more than a year younger than the second, I would pick the first as everyone can probably train 2 skill points in a season, unless the Chasers are both nearing the decreasing age, then I would pick the second. Just use your logic (if you have some).

Hopefully this addition helped!
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Xter
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Re: Mood and Form

Postby Xter » Mon Jul 18, 2016 5:47 pm

I have nothing to add onto what Prof X said, other than a question for Cygnus:

Does favorite position have an effect on attributes or any of that? Or does it just change what position a player plays?

But you wouldn't need to change their position, you could just play them in a different position and let proficiency go up and you wouldn't have to talk to them every day.
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Re: Mood and Form

Postby Sokolov » Mon Jul 18, 2016 9:09 pm

Xter wrote:I have nothing to add onto what Prof X said, other than a question for Cygnus:

Does favorite position have an effect on attributes or any of that? Or does it just change what position a player plays?

But you wouldn't need to change their position, you could just play them in a different position and let proficiency go up and you wouldn't have to talk to them every day.


Yes it affects their performance, playing out of position is again 75% of skills I believe.
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Re: Mood and Form

Postby Xter » Mon Jul 18, 2016 10:52 pm

Sokolov wrote:
Yes it affects their performance, playing out of position is again 75% of skills I believe.


Ok. I'll post back here again when I have added the "out-of-position effect" to the formula.


EDIT:

I think it is just 100-{(100-x)/4} x being the percent of how favorite that position is.
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Re: Mood and Form

Postby Sokolov » Tue Jul 19, 2016 1:42 am

Xter wrote:
Sokolov wrote:
Yes it affects their performance, playing out of position is again 75% of skills I believe.


Ok. I'll post back here again when I have added the "out-of-position effect" to the formula.


EDIT:

I think it is just 100-{(100-x)/4} x being the percent of how favorite that position is.


Actually i do not believe it's a spectrum, in this case it's a binary, sorry i wasn't clear. It either is their favorite position, or it is not. If it is not, they get 75% of their skills. If it is, they get 100%.
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Re: Mood and Form

Postby Xter » Tue Jul 19, 2016 4:43 am

Sokolov wrote:
Actually i do not believe it's a spectrum, in this case it's a binary, sorry i wasn't clear. It either is their favorite position, or it is not. If it is not, they get 75% of their skills. If it is, they get 100%.


Okay. Which brings up the question: What constitutes it as their favorite position? I would assume having 50%+1 in a position would make it a players favorite position.
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